Ramblings of a Jersey Yogi

steamspunkironman:

mistletease:

ohhaiguise:

sirscrewloose:

legendofsherlock:

notenjolras:

#can we please discuss the fact that this movie was made by Americans

#some of us might actually be self-aware

Nobody has to deal with americans more than other americans.

I am an american and I can verify that this is indeed true.

#everyone else gets to be annoyed by Americans from afar #while Americans have to be annoyed by other Americans loudly and up close

horrifically true

(Source: kisedbyfire, via klamille-kennett)

yolesoteldo:

Dear Cutie-Pie,
Recently, your mother and I were searching for an answer on Google. Halfway through entering the question, Google returned a list of the most popular searches in the world. Perched at the top of the list was “How to keep him interested.”
It startled me. I scanned several of the countless articles about how to be sexy and sexual, when to bring him a beer versus a sandwich, and the ways to make him feel smart and superior.
And I got angry.
Little One, it is not, has never been, and never will be your job to “keep him interested.”
Little One, your only task is to know deeply in your soul—in that unshakeable place that isn’t rattled by rejection and loss and ego—that you are worthy of interest. (If you can remember that everyone else is worthy of interest also, the battle of your life will be mostly won. But that is a letter for another day.)
If you can trust your worth in this way, you will be attractive in the most important sense of the word: you will attract a boy who is both capable of interest and who wants to spend his one life investing all of his interest in you.
Little One, I want to tell you about the boy who doesn’t need to be keptinterested, because he knows you are interesting:
I don’t care if he puts his elbows on the dinner table—as long as he puts his eyes on the way your nose scrunches when you smile. And then can’t stop looking.
I don’t care if he can’t play a bit of golf with me—as long as he can play with the children you give him and revel in all the glorious and frustrating ways they are just like you.
I don’t care if he doesn’t follow his wallet—as long as he follows his heart and it always leads him back to you.
I don’t care if he is strong—as long as he gives you the space to exercise the strength that is in your heart.
I couldn’t care less how he votes—as long as he wakes up every morning and daily elects you to a place of honor in your home and a place of reverence in his heart.
I don’t care about the color of his skin—as long as he paints the canvas of your lives with brushstrokes of patience, and sacrifice, and vulnerability, and tenderness.
I don’t care if he was raised in this religion or that religion or no religion—as long as he was raised to value the sacred and to know every moment of life, and every moment of life with you, is deeply sacred.
In the end, Little One, if you stumble across a man like that and he and I have nothing else in common, we will have the most important thing in common:
You.
Because in the end, Little One, the only thing you should have to do to “keep him interested” is to be you.
Your eternally interested guy,
Daddy
Happy International Women’s Day

yolesoteldo:

Dear Cutie-Pie,

Recently, your mother and I were searching for an answer on Google. Halfway through entering the question, Google returned a list of the most popular searches in the world. Perched at the top of the list was “How to keep him interested.”

It startled me. I scanned several of the countless articles about how to be sexy and sexual, when to bring him a beer versus a sandwich, and the ways to make him feel smart and superior.

And I got angry.

Little One, it is not, has never been, and never will be your job to “keep him interested.”

Little One, your only task is to know deeply in your soul—in that unshakeable place that isn’t rattled by rejection and loss and ego—that you are worthy of interest. (If you can remember that everyone else is worthy of interest also, the battle of your life will be mostly won. But that is a letter for another day.)

If you can trust your worth in this way, you will be attractive in the most important sense of the word: you will attract a boy who is both capable of interest and who wants to spend his one life investing all of his interest in you.

Little One, I want to tell you about the boy who doesn’t need to be keptinterested, because he knows you are interesting:

I don’t care if he puts his elbows on the dinner table—as long as he puts his eyes on the way your nose scrunches when you smile. And then can’t stop looking.

I don’t care if he can’t play a bit of golf with me—as long as he can play with the children you give him and revel in all the glorious and frustrating ways they are just like you.

I don’t care if he doesn’t follow his wallet—as long as he follows his heart and it always leads him back to you.

I don’t care if he is strong—as long as he gives you the space to exercise the strength that is in your heart.

I couldn’t care less how he votes—as long as he wakes up every morning and daily elects you to a place of honor in your home and a place of reverence in his heart.

I don’t care about the color of his skin—as long as he paints the canvas of your lives with brushstrokes of patience, and sacrifice, and vulnerability, and tenderness.

I don’t care if he was raised in this religion or that religion or no religion—as long as he was raised to value the sacred and to know every moment of life, and every moment of life with you, is deeply sacred.

In the end, Little One, if you stumble across a man like that and he and I have nothing else in common, we will have the most important thing in common:

You.

Because in the end, Little One, the only thing you should have to do to “keep him interested” is to be you.

Your eternally interested guy,

Daddy

Happy International Women’s Day

(via disney-and-thedoctor)

alittlecoconuttart:

"Republican Lawmakers Sends Tweet Saying Street Crime Would Increase If NBA Folded" (Baragona 2014)
[Article excerpt]
After that tweet went out, Garofalo was bombarded with replies from people who rightly saw it as offensive and racist. Nearly three-fourths of the NBA’s players are African-American. Obviously, Garofalo is playing to the stereotype that all young black males are criminals and hoodlums. When initially confronted by his local news channel and ESPN, Garofalo was defiant and suggested that he was just being honest and truthful with his statement.
Below is what he said to ESPN on Sunday:

“I was talking about the NBA’s high arrest rate and that their punishment for positive drug tests are weaker than other leagues. No intent beyond that. The culture among many pro athletes that they are above the law is the problem, not people like me pointing that problem out.”

Also, he said the following to KARE 11 in Minnesota:

“I really don’t understand how being critical of a culture of pro athletes has anything to do with race. This is a behavior that transcends the race of the athlete, and it seems to be a culture in all professional sports these days.”

Of course, he might possibly be able to defend his position if it was true that NBA players get arrested at a high rate, especially in comparison with the rest of the country. However, on Monday, Kyle Wagner at Regressing, an affiliate site of Deadspin and Gawker, published an article debunking the notion that NBA players are criminals who are constantly getting arrested.
As the article pointed out, the arrest rate for the country as a whole is 4.25%. In Minnesota, it is 3.96%. Males aged 20-34, which is a better overall comparison to NBA players, have an arrest rate of 13.18.  However, the arrest rate for the NBA this season is 1.92%! Therefore, whatever point Garofalo was trying to make, other than he is an ignorant racist, was made absolutely moot.

alittlecoconuttart:

"Republican Lawmakers Sends Tweet Saying Street Crime Would Increase If NBA Folded" (Baragona 2014)

[Article excerpt]

After that tweet went out, Garofalo was bombarded with replies from people who rightly saw it as offensive and racist. Nearly three-fourths of the NBA’s players are African-American. Obviously, Garofalo is playing to the stereotype that all young black males are criminals and hoodlums. When initially confronted by his local news channel and ESPN, Garofalo was defiant and suggested that he was just being honest and truthful with his statement.

Below is what he said to ESPN on Sunday:

“I was talking about the NBA’s high arrest rate and that their punishment for positive drug tests are weaker than other leagues. No intent beyond that. The culture among many pro athletes that they are above the law is the problem, not people like me pointing that problem out.”

Also, he said the following to KARE 11 in Minnesota:

“I really don’t understand how being critical of a culture of pro athletes has anything to do with race. This is a behavior that transcends the race of the athlete, and it seems to be a culture in all professional sports these days.”

Of course, he might possibly be able to defend his position if it was true that NBA players get arrested at a high rate, especially in comparison with the rest of the country. However, on Monday, Kyle Wagner at Regressing, an affiliate site of Deadspin and Gawker, published an article debunking the notion that NBA players are criminals who are constantly getting arrested.

As the article pointed out, the arrest rate for the country as a whole is 4.25%. In Minnesota, it is 3.96%. Males aged 20-34, which is a better overall comparison to NBA players, have an arrest rate of 13.18.  However, the arrest rate for the NBA this season is 1.92%! Therefore, whatever point Garofalo was trying to make, other than he is an ignorant racist, was made absolutely moot.

(via wanderthenwonder)